Saturday, May 1, 2010

Tutorial: Vintage-looking painted sign from salvaged wood

Today I have a little tutorial for you. I'm going to show you how to (easily!) make these sweet wooden signs. I promise- they're a cinch, they don't take long at all to make and cost pretty much nothing.




You will need:
piece of salvaged wood
upholstery tacks or short nails (optional)
hammer
acrylic paint (background color)
black acrylic paint (or other color to fill in letters)
large paint brush
small paint brush
ink jet printer
twine
Sharpie Marker or other dull, rounded tool

This project started with a pile of cedar fence pieces that we've had sitting in our backyard for ages. My husband had just loaded a good portion of them into our chiminea to be burned when I got the idea for these signs and was able to save them from becoming ash.

I loved how grey and weathered they had become from sitting outside. Start by lightly sanding your piece of wood if it's too rough, or just wiping it off to remove any dirt or other loose particles.

Next, distress the wood to your liking. I hammered a few upholstery tacks into the corners, added a couple of empty nail holes then banged on it with the claw of my hammer. In the photo below the top piece is untouched and the bottom one has been beaten. Poor thing.



Next, choose your paint. Most home improvement stores sell miss-tinted paints for very cheap, so during one of my visits to the Home Depot I picked up this little sample pot of pretty blueish gray paint for .50. Sweet! After experimenting with different paints while makig these signs, I've found that the less sheen the paint has, the better. Cheap acrylic craft paint works best, flat latex paint like the kind I used here is next best. DON'T bother with spray paint- your letters won't transfer well at all.
(I wasn't really sure if I was going to be doing a tutorial for this or not until I was finished, so I'm afraid I'm missing a few photos for some of the steps. Don't worry. It will make sense anyway.)

After you've properly dented and nicked your piece of wood to perfection and added your tacks or nails, take your large , dry paint brush and get a little paint on it. Wipe off any excess on the lip of your paint can and sweep your paint lightly over the wood. You're not going for a perfect paint job here. In fact, you want it to be as imperfect as possible without it looking like you were trying to make it imperfect, if that makes any sense. And don't bother painting the sides, just the front.

Once you're happy with the paint, put the wood aside to dry and head to your computer. Choose a word and a font that you want on your sign and enlarge it to a size that will fit on the piece of wood that you have. Flip it so it's backwards and print.

I used Adobe Photoshop to print my backwards words using the "Rotate Canvas" feature under Image, then clicking on "Flip Horizontal". If you're using another software program like Microsoft Word, it might be a little trickier. Check the already submitted comments to see if you can find something that works, or check out this link that I found that explains how to either flip the text using your printer's functions, or in Word itself. It seems like kind of an involved process, but I tried it with my older version of Word and it worked.

Go back to your wood and rinse the paintbrush you just used, but don't worry about getting the brush dry.

Turn your piece of paper over so that the ink is face down on your wood, position it so that it's centered (I like to crease the bottom of my paper along the edge of the wood so it doesn't move around) and begin brushing the paper with your wet paintbrush.

You don't want to make your paper sopping wet or the ink will just run and the paper will disintegrate. Just wet it enough so that it seeps through to the other side and starts to release the ink from the paper.

Take your Sharpie lid and begin to burnish your letters going horizontally and vertically. You want to transfer as much of the ink from the paper to the wood as you can. Don't peek, though. You don't want to accidentally shift your paper. Just scribble over each letter being sure you've burnished over every bit of each one.

Here's what it should look like when you're done. You could leave it like this if you want it to be really faded looking, or...

... you can go back with your small paint brush and fill in the letters a little with some very, very diluted black paint.

Once you've finished with the word, distress the sign a little more with some sandpaper, taking off some of the paint along the edges and swiping it over the word a bit to make it look more aged and authentic.

Finally, nail or staple twine to the back of your wood to act as a hanger for your new, old-looking sign.

I used some of my favorite foods for the signs I made for my kitchen and I just adore them. The "cocoa" sign was the very first one I did, and as you can see I was more deliberate when filling in the letters with paint than I was with the others. I like the faded look of the other ones more, so I'll go back and sand it a little so that it matches them better.



Here are a couple more signs that need their twine hangers nailed on before they make the trip to the consignment store. I plan on making several more using other colors of paint and maybe even other colors of ink! Wouldn't it be cute to have a little white-washed board with the word "apples" painted on it in red? I haven't tried using other colors of ink yet, but I don't know why it wouldn't work just as well as the black.

Don't limit yourself to food items when thinking of words to put on these signs. You could hang these above a bedroom door and paint the child's name on them, or your favorite inspirational word or scripture reference, or a simple word like "family" or "home" or "welcome". There's really no limit to where these could go in your house. I might just have to make another "soap" one for my laundry room.

One final added note: these signs can be made for outdoor use!  Just brush, wipe or spray with a polyurethane finish to seal and protect them from the elements.

Anyway, I hope you enjoyed the tutorial, and that you can salvage some wood to create a custom sign for your home!

P.S. I'm linking to Frugal Friday on











EDIT: I apologize for taking so long to answer this question, but a few of you have wondered if an ink jet printer or a laser printer is required. I have a cheap old ink jet, which is what I used for this project. I have no idea if a laser printer would produce an image that would transfer using this method. Anyone tried it?

352 comments:

«Oldest   ‹Older   201 – 352 of 352
pytluvsu said...

If you copy to Paint, you can flip it horizontally.
Thanks for telling it doesn't work with Laser, so I don't waste my time!

Julie said...

Have a quick question... Can I print different words out and use them at a different time or do the words need to be used immediately? Not sure I asked that correctly... Like if I print off say 10 words but I might be able to have time to make a sign for 5 days, will the ink still transfer?

Anonymous said...

If you are using a laser printer, I have had success transferring photographs to wood blocks using acrylic gel medium, pressing the picture on, allowing to dry overnight, and the next day making the paper just wet enough that you can roll in off in pieces with your fingers. Maybe this would work with typography too?

ATwitterPatedLife said...

Because of the difference in how the printers distribute ink on the paper, it will work with an ink jet but not a laser printer.

snaphappie said...

This is so cool. Now need to find somewhere that needs a fab new vintagey sign x

busseltonpph said...

Hi Sarah

I just thought I would answer a few questions. I hope that's not rude. Please feel free to delete this comment, if so. xoxox

Laser vs Inkjet - inkjets use ink which is liquid and laser uses toner which is heat-seat powder. Inkjet works because it is soluble.

How long after printing? - it will depend on your paper and inkjet, but here's some info.
Inkjet will never completley 'set' so if you have printed onto a thicker piece of paper (more than 80gsm), then it will transfer well quite a few days after you have printed it.

Background paint? - you need to use water-based paint for the transfer to happen properly. Oil-based will 'repel' water and ink.

Printed letters in reverse - you choose to 'mirror' in 'page settings' when you print the document. Do a search on the internet for your printer on how to do this (every printer will be slightly different)

Other mediums? - you can use this method on anything pourous (fabric, etc)

Black painted wood? - unfortunately you cannot use this technique on a dark background. You would have to 'stencil' your letters. (there's no such thing as WHITE INK)

Transfer too light? - depending on your printer, you will have a variation of the amount and strength of ink that comes out of the paper. Some transfers will be quite faint. [As Sarah pointed out]

Transferring with water - if there are problems, try using a misting bottle rather a paintbrush. It will add less water and you have more control if you need to add more.

Sarah,
I hope this is helpful for your 'peeps'. I have visited your blog regularly and find you incredibly inspiring.

Love your work! xox

SusanB said...

I have wondered how this was done. Thank you SO MUCH for sharing!

Anita Lasanowski said...

Thanks for posting. I have wanted to make signs for years because I love quotes. This has prompted me to give it a try. Great addition to a home made gift basket love it :)

Punkz4Christ said...

I love this idea, thank you Sarah! I 've always thought there had to be an easy way to do this! @busseltonpph thank you for your tips, very helpful!

Adrienne Connolly said...

Just wanted to give anyone who's wondering a tip if you have a laser printer instead of ink jet. It WILL work, but it's a different process. You still print the word in reverse, but you use your iron to transfer the image. We only have an inkjet, so I make printouts from the computers at our local library when I do wood burning, and that's how I get my letters nice and even. How that helps someone! :)

Adrienne Connolly said...

*Hope. Dang autocorrect. Also, if you've already given your surface a base coat of paint, be careful not to set your iron too hot when transferring your design. It can scorch of melt your paint. I usually print a random symbol or letter to use as a test on the back of my project first, where I can sand it off later if necessary. I start with my iron pretty low, and increase it as needed until I find the setting that will transfer my ink, but not burn the surface.

Sheila WB said...

Found you on pinterest. Cute idea. They really work!

Sheila WB said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Wow! Awesome idea! Thank you so much for sharing! :)

Anonymous said...

found your info on Pinterest. This is AWESOME!!!!

Thanks for the info on how to do this
Megan C

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Lisa Hamel said...

What a great idea! I think this is the perfect answer for a project I just thought of yesterday. Serendipitous, indeed. : )

Lisa @ mysurperbia.blogspot.com and theeverydayceliac.blogspot.com

Alva Phillips said...

Ohm, this was indeed very artistic…I have always wanted to make one but suddenly no good results at all…
Regards,
Alva@Sign Maker

Ashley Picanco said...

This is such a cute idea! I discovered this tutorial on Pinterest, and posted a blog post about it on my own blog (with proper credit to you, of course!).

Thanks for sharing such a great idea! You can see my post about your tutorial here

Siena Van Brabant said...

I did as suggested.... Copied my Word 2010 text, pasted into Paint. Select All, then flipped vertically in Paint under Image, Rotate, Flip Vertical. Select all again, Copied. Pasted in Word 2010. Worked like a charm. Thanks for sharing

Lisa said...

So, this was Arnold post, so you probably know this, and I don't have time to read through over 200 comments to find out if it's been said, but you can still use any type of discounted mis-tint paint you find on those endcaps.....gloss to whatever, doesn't matter. Just mix it with plaster of Paris to get rid of the sheen! Thanks for the tutorial, I was here looking for the technique to transfer a picture on to canvas and I think I'll make some cute signs out of pallet wood while I'm at it! Thanks!

Katie said...

I used your technique on a wooden sign yesterday and it worked perfectly, thank you so much!!! You can see mine here: http://upcycledtreasures.com/2013/05/diy-wood-sign-using-your-printer/
~Katie

Anonymous said...

Toner prints are not water soluble, it is a heat process. Also some print dialogue windows will allow you to print in reverse.

Shawn said...

This seems to be a nice easy method of achieving a really good result. I have "aquired" a shed full of 4'x 6" lengths of wood and, like you,i was desperately trying to think of something to do with them before they got burnt. This is perfect, i will certainly be giving it a go!

Anonymous said...

I did what a. Wonderful. World. For my parents. 25 wedding anniversary since that was their wedding song

CJMsquared+5 said...

Adorable! Thanks for sharing!

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Debbie Fisher (debbiedee) said...

Love this! I would like to know what fonts you used too.

Anonymous said...

I have done this in the past with a laser printer using Tea Tree Oil. Must do one letter at a time, barely wetting it (or it will run) and then burnishing with a soda bottle lid. Did a long scripture on a foyer wall in our church. It turned out fabulous!

Anonymous said...

Laser printer work best! Definitely! You can use to transfer laquer thinner, hot iron (you have to heat the wood first, then put the paper on it and press it down at ca. 170°C for about 20 seconds). It works fine and it is so quickly done!

Vintage Sign said...

I'm facing so many difficulties in making these antique wood signs. You made it so simple and easy.Thanks for sharing this blog.

Amanda Westfall said...

I have Adobe Photoshop too, but how do you create just a blank page to type on?
~Amanda

Amanda Westfall said...

I have Adobe Photoshop as well... But how do you create a blank page to type on in the first place?

Thanks!
~Amanda

Kayla S. said...

I just did this and it turned out awesome! I used a metal sign from Hobby Lobby and I went over the words with permanent marker because it's going to be for outside. I am so excited that it worked! I think I'm going to have to do this a million more times. THANK YOU SO MUCH!
P.S. Here's a link to my sign:
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByZ0eMz5vnK8VU9XLU1UMkVvYW8/edit?usp=sharing

Anonymous said...

I didn't read all of the comments, but after going through a bunch I have some input. If you use an ink jet printer and don't want to mess around with wetting your paper, you could try printing on parchment. I have never used this technique on wood, but I carve my own stamps this way. I tape a piece of parchment paper to regular printer paper, print on it and press the image on to my carving block. On the rubber, it smudges when you touch the image, but I imagine it would soak in to the wood the same as with the wetting it technique since the ink won't absorb in to the parchment. When I have used this technique, you don't even have to hurry because the ink doesn't dry up right away. I think I will try it.....

Vintage Sign said...

Great! Just love your technique of making antique wood signs so easily.Good job done by you.

Innah | Ink Refills Canon said...

Wow! I never thought that I will be able to see salvaged wood as a very interesting object. This DIY project seems great and you made the process appear to be so simple. Thanks for sharing!

Anonymous said...

I haven't read all the comments but wanted to add this. My apologies if it's already there! I have used the same method to transfer the ink on to fabric. Stop at the part where you place the paper over the wood, instead of wetting it to transfer the design try ironing it! It's worth a try and a lot less messy! Good luck, I hope it works for you.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much, I see that I am a little late at creating this project. My, I was so surprised this was done long ago. We have an outdoor wedding in a country camping ground with a little white church building on the grounds.We will have several outdoor signs with all kinds of "love" sentiments on them. Thank you again. DRU

Adam D. said...

I just performed this technique using a laser printer and using lacquer thinner instead of water. Just dampen the paper with the lacquer thinner (it will dry quickly so you'll probably need a couple of "re-applies" before you're done if you're talking a larger piece). I rubbed the thinner into the paper using a painter's rag and then burnished the letters with the rounded head of an eye-bolt. Worked like a charm. The transfer was so good, I had to scuff it up with sandpaper to get the "antiqued" look to the print.

Thanks for the inspiration for this idea which led me in hunt of a way to do the same with laser printers. I found it so I figured I'd share.

Sandra said...

you are brilliant!

Anonymous said...

You can do this with a laser printer but the technique is a bit different. Apply matte medium to the wood. While still wet, place the reversed type on paper to the wood. Lt dry overnight. The next day, wet the paper thoroughly. Rub the paper off and it will leave the toner letters on the wood! Finish with mod Podge.

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Momma O said...

What a wonderful tutorial! Thank you so much for sharing!

Sandra D. said...

I just started following you and I was just wondering, do you know how to make standing wooden signs like this? I love this idea, and will definitely try it how you instructed for now. But I know that i'd like to make a standing wooden sign also, not one like a photo frame with just the stand to lean on, but one that stands independently. I've seen them in stores and i'm sure the process of transferring words works the same, i'm just not sure how to make it standing. I'd love to do this as a gift for my young cousins birthday and for a friend thats gone to college who I might see soon. I'd also like to see if with the standing sign there might be a possible way to put a secret compartment on it? There would be an empty space in the back of it and maybe a door could be disguised there somehow. I might be rambling now, but hep with a standing sign would be lovely if you could, thank you!

Underhill said...

If you're using Pages, you can print the font in a mirrored image by typing your text in a text box. Then, you go to "Arrange" and press "Flip horizontally". I haven't tried this with Word, but I bet it has a similar feature.

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure if anyone has already answered this, but if you are using Microsoft Word and are trying to flip it backwards. Just type your word, use your snipping tool, paste the word you snipped and then use the rotate button to flip it. Sounds like a lot, but takes like 2 minutes!!

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Sandi said...

hi all,

In case this hasn't been mentioned, if you use Word, print your words backwards - etalocohC instead of Chocolate - and then place on your board. What I suggest is typing out the word correctly THEN following it to do the backwards so there is less of a chance of mis-spelling it :)

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Beth S. said...

If you have a laser printer this should help you. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ayMMeviJx-E

Sheila Sanders said...

Thank you for the tutorial.... I love rustic signs..... In fact I have made some from the old boards that fell out of an old nail barrel. My favorite one says... "Jesus knows me.... This I love!" a play on the song Jesus Loves Me.

BILL BRANCA said...

I love this. I am going to do it ASAP!!

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julia kaiser said...

you CAN flip text with Microsoft word. follow these directions:
Word can't flip text directly, but it can flip text in a text box. First, insert a text box-it's on the Insert tab in the Text group. Then enter the text you want to flip and format it accordingly. The flip it, do the following:
1. Right-click the text box (best to click on the right or left line of the text box) and choose Format Shape (should appear near or at the bottom of the list)
2. Choose 3-D Rotation in the left pane.
3. Change the X setting to 180.
4. Press enter or close, and Word flips the text in the text box, producing a mirror image.
If you do not want to see the text box outline, you then click the home tab, and on the last tab, "format" there should also show a drawing tools above format. click on format and then on shape outline and check the box that says "no outline". if you have a backround color in the text box, this can also be removed by clicking on shape fill, and check the "no fill" box. exit by clicking on your document, and you should have a plain flipped text.

Anonymous said...

Just in case no one has figured it out yet, when you go on Microsoft word to type it, you have to insert a text box and type it in the text box. Select the text box and right click. Go down to "format shape" and click on it, then go to text options. Under the second category of options, there is a text box that you can type in next to "X Rotation" type in 180, hit enter and it should be mirrored :)

Anonymous said...

Ummm can't you just type the word backwards? I haven't tried it, maybe it is just too easy???

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Anonymous said...

I have just found this post and think it is terrific.

Jeremy Sangster said...

I love this idea. I came across a blog that made a wooden sign, but with a different technique. I decided to combine your idea with theirs. Your idea was awesome! You can check out my project here if you'd like:
Wooden Sign: The Names

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What ink did you use ?

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Claudia Rosenburg said...

I love these! They give off such a cozy look, which is exactly what my apartment needs. Where are good places to find salvaged wood?
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Anonymous said...

Select to reverse your image in the menu bar to flip horizontally.

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Joseph Marie said...

I totally LOVE this! I've done screenprinted signs previously, yet making the screen is unmanageable and a considerable measure of work. I've needed to do some new ones, and with this technique I am persuaded! So much less demanding, and almost as pleasant! Much obliged concerning imparting!

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Karon Parrish said...

Many printers have the option of printing mirror image. Look under your printer "Properties" button for "mirror output" "flip horizontal".

Albert einstien said...

yes was hereIt's been good to see your blog when I always look for such type of blogs. It’s great to discover the post here.

Lisa Davis said...

What a gorgeous idea. I think my house is going to be covered in signs!

Follay said...

I absolutely love your crafts. I was wondering if you could help me. I want to make something for my girlfriend. Our anniversary is coming up very quickly. Do you have any cute craft ideas?

Follay said...

I was wondering if you could help me with a gift idea? You can email me at jmichfollett@gmail.com

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Anonymous said...

Just write the words backwards

Anonymous said...

I am definitely going to give this a shot! I use the pages program, to get a mirror image, type the text in a text box. Then, go to "arrange" to flip both horizontally and vertically. Super simple!

John Locke said...

Nice idea i really like your idea now i will make Toner Cartridge for Printers by using your methodology thanks for sharing such a nice idea keep it up.

piercelaye55 said...

Thanks for giving these ideas!! I also want to make a name plate for my house and want to know which type of wood will be better. Last time I made a guitar from African Ebony wood and it is looking beautiful with wonderful finishing.

Photo Printer said...

I have no idea if a laser printer would produce an image that would transfer ... iphotoprinter.blogspot.com

Gem said...

I love your ideas, thanks

Jake Simpson said...

Thanks for this post! This was really helpful to me. Keep up the great work here!

Leni Davenport said...

In answer to a very old question on this thread, yes you can use a laser. As soon as it comes off the printer, place print-side down on the wood and pass a hot iron over the paper, being careful not to shift paper. You may need to hold several second to transfer as much as you want. It also works on fabric.

SuesAkornShop said...

What a neat idea!

Susan Druery said...

Thankyou so much for this tutorial. This is something I will certainly try this weekend...

Susan Druery said...

Thankyou so much for this tutorial. This is something I will certainly try this weekend...

Susan Druery said...

Thankyou so much for this tutorial. This is something I will certainly try this weekend...

Anonymous said...

I did not have time to look through each and every comment but to answer the question ... will a laser printer work. the answer is ... no. it will not. Ink jet or bubble jet uses ink but a laser printer uses a special paper with a heating element so there is no ink on the page to transfer.

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Debbie Lieber said...

For those having problems with your transfer being very light, you M&D that check the PRINT QUALITY on the Properties setting of your printer. You should see Draft, and one or two other settings which determine how much ink is applied to the paper, and for this process you would select BEST or the equivalent of the highest quality printing. Different words are used to describe that process but Draft is usually commonly used OR Grayscale and both mean the very least amount of ink applied to the paper. So you want to select the highest quality in order to have maximum ink on the paper to transfer to your wood for this type process. Your default settings are probably at Normal. Just something to double check if your aren't getting much transfer and all the other steps are followed. Good Luck! Debbie

Anonymous said...

In response to the question about transferring laser ink....have you tried placing a very warm iron on the paper to transfer. .don't slide it just press and hold for about 30 seconds. This is how I transfer laser printing to brass to make plaques and signs. Just a thought.

LRCote said...

It helps if you're using s fresh ink jet print. I let the print sit for a couple of days (we got rain, and I don;t want to sand in my kitchen), and it didn't transfer at all.

Anonymous said...

This didn't work for me. Sad.

Samantha Larson said...

Laser jet doesn't wor AT ALL. Not even a little bit. Bah. At least I didn't ruin my sign with that attempt

Samantha Larson said...

It does! Laser jet doesn't work AT ALL.

Lisa said...

love,love, LOVE this idea. Thanks so much for taking the time to make a tutorial. I am so going to make some this summer!

Shawn Deny said...

Practiced the word on paper first so I was confident the letters would line up right and then marked a chalkline on my wood so I had a base line to line up the stamps with and stamped away!

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Laura said...

To answer the questions about the type of printer, it has to be a Laserjet pinter, not inkjet. Laserjet ink is a powder, and that's why it transfers.

Anonymous said...

You can also use Mac's note app. Just type it out, go to print settings, and you can reverse the text there. So simple!

Katie said...

This project is so cool! I just got a palette so I can't wait to try it. I kind of suck at stenciling lol!

Anonymous said...

Can't you just spell the word backwards then print it ?

Christine
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Shannon Williams said...

Hi! I just saw a link to your post on Pinterest! This is such a great, and easy (as promised!) way to make signs! Thank you for this tutorial! I'm going to save it to my barn wood board! ~wvclaylady~

Nameless for now said...

I tried it today with an HP laser printer and it did not work. I was bummed.

Anonymous said...

I believe the type of printer makes a difference. I just tried this project and nothing happened. No transfer at all.

Carol Grzeschik said...

Just so you all know. It depends on the printer if you have this feature. My old printer had it and it was great. The current inkjet doesn't and it is driving me bonkers!!!

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Unknown said...

LaserJet can be transferred with an iron. I use a small iron attachment on my wood burner.

Doc Nikkels said...

LaserJet can be transferred with an iron. I use a small iron attachment on my wood burner.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for your example!! exactly what I was looking for to try my first sign, I saw a sign on pintrest and thought " I could do that" did a little research, watched a couple you tube tutorials and yours is very helpful. Thanks again, I'm excited to make a special sign for a friend.

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GingerInk said...

A laser printer *does* work, but not with water. You'll want lacquer thinner, and the print will transfer onto fabric or wood or paint or whatever. Dampen the project first with thinner on a paper towel, then position the print face down on your project. *Soak* the paper towel in lacquer thinner, and then rub the *back* of your print 'til the image transfers to the project.

I have used a black Sharpie marker on fabric to fill in the design [which I wanted, for a gorgeous ampersand on my decorated shopping bag!] but I plan to get a medium grey permanent marker [Prismacolor] for future projects. That way the permanence of the design is not dependent on its staying dry.

Btw--lacquer thinner also dissolves graphite, so you could write your own calligraphy and transfer it to...whatever.

GingerInk said...

Laser printers use toner rather than ink. Toner is dissolved by lacquer thinner, rather than water.

Serviced Apartments London Lady said...

Love this sign, I see stuff like this on the high street all the time, it's really coming back into fashion.

Deanna Santana said...

Flip on computer before you print

Anders Jener said...

I did lot of review about wood working plan and I found one of the best website, I am using for my wood working, it contains all woodworking plans include workbench plans, shed plans, chair ... WOODPRIX has the best handbooks and ready instructions

Trey Hogan said...

This method also works on photos. I have transferred old timey produce basket photos onto wood many times. The only difference is the use of modge podge to help the colors transfer along with water.

Johnson Karen said...

It feels awe-inspiring to read such informative and distinctive articles on your websites.Health

Anonymous said...

oh thank you SO much. most tutorials ask for gel medium or modpodge and I'm too frugal to use all my craft money just to try something. I already have a long project list in my head. have you ever done it onto a canvas or fabric? I will be trying this soon

handknithearts said...

The easiest way I've found to make a mirror image of lettering is actually in Paint. Just select the area around your text, click the "rotate" button and then select "Flip horizontal."

Additionally, you may have the ability to print a mirror image of a document in your printer's advanced settings, particularly if it has a setting for printing on transparencies. There are lots of different printer menus, so you'll just have to fiddle around with it to figure that out.

Anonymous said...

If you want to use word for the letters: insert word art or textbox, write your words and make them large, right click on the object, format shape, click on 3D rotation and change X to 180 degrees.

Anonymous said...

I followed your entire process to turn some driftwood I found on a local beach into a sign, and it worked perfectly! I love the worn, painted look I got on the wood, and the letters transferred with a beautifully worn look, too. I just saw the comments about laser printers and lacquer thinner. That'll be my next experiment. Thank you for sharing your process with such clear, easy-to-follow instructions, and thanks for keeping it on the internets years later for all of us to enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)

Herry jonson said...

We can print literally anything, on a huge variety of papers and sizes. We list the most commonly Printing quote on our site, but there’s a lot more that we can do. So give it a shot – tell us about what you are looking for and we’ll get to work on a printing quote just for you.

Anonymous said...

Check in your printers settings for paper type, most modern printers have a T-Shirt transfer paper option, this allows text & pictures to be printed backwards as when the (iron on) transfer paper is used it comes out the right way round on the t-shirt. this option works on other papers too.

Anonymous said...

Just read her instructions everything is in her instructions.. but you must read not just look at the pictures :/

Anonymous said...

Or you could use the sharpie to define the letters or color inside

Emily Adams said...

Very informative and unique tips dear. Thanks for sharing.

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Aeldra Robinson said...

This is really a brilliant idea. Most students in today's generation love watching television. Digital signage would really contribute to their knowledge and awareness regarding to what's happening inside and outside their campus.

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ElizabethClare said...

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! I've been wanting those beautiful wood signs, but I cannot cough up the money for them! Now it seems I can do them quickly myself! Awesome~

Sweet Honey Bee said...

I've researched many transferring of lettering/pics onto various objects but ESPECIALLY wood & THIS.... BY FAR, IS HANDS DOWN, THE MOST SIMPLISTIC, ESAY TO FOLLOW, USE WHATEVER YOU HAVE ON HAND, BEST DESCRIBED TUTORIAL YET!!!!!!! GREAT JOB!THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU!!!!

Siobhan O'Driscoll said...

Hasn't worked unfortunately, ink didn't transfer onto wood ��

Hong Kong Serviced Apartments said...

Very helpful ideas are provided here I am very excited after read that article post.

Unknown said...

sweet

Dot2dot said...

Nice blog. Thanks for sharing useful information. Digital Signage

Mascomid said...

Thanks for sharing this information.Nice article you have been posted, It's very informative and helpful.Transfer Furniture Company

Anonymous said...

Thank you!

wooden letters said...

So creative work you have done..Thanks for sharing this information

wooden letters said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
GingerInk said...

That's what I do: I go over the transfer with a Sharpie. Great results.

GingerInk said...

A laser printer works very well. However, you need lacquer thinner on a rag instead of water on a paint brush fir the transfer. And I use the back of a spoon for the pressure needed to complete the transfer.

Works on fabric, too.

Then usually I fill in the transfered design with Sharpie marker. Great way to decorate canvas shopping bags!

GingerInk said...

Laser is hotter, to be sure, but not water soluble. Use lacquer thinner instead.

wooden letters said...

I love this idea! So cute and original! I'm always looking for something different for our door besides a wreath. Thanks for sharing!

parkdentalcenter said...

Well explained and these are the great ideas for decorating home wall with these wooden letters

wooden letters said...

This is really nice because it well informative for me and hope for others also keep it continued so that we can get benefits Wooden Symbols. Really very helpfull!!!

wooden letters said...

This is really nice because it well informative for me and hope for others also keep it continued so that we can get benefits Wooden Symbols. Really very helpfull!!!

Ramya Leela said...

This was nice Blog, thanks for sharing that was simply good
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Rita McMillan said...

I'm in the process of trying this and desperately need it to work, but my letters won't transfer AT ALL. Nothing shows up on my board, it just ends up damp. I'm trying to transfer to a pine board with distressing paint on it, matte chalk finish. I'm using an inkjet printer, and trying to transfer immediately after retrieved from the printer. Help! I'm desperate!

Satish Ratan said...

Very good post. Sign boards are very important for many places and most importantly for commercial businesses. With many new technology, signage company business has become very profitable.

Satish Ratan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Can you point me to this I can't see to find how to mirror image the text

Jade Graham said...

the gate frame and the thickness of the wood we're planning to use for the brace (e.g., 1.5" for the thin side of a 2 x 4).
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